23 Sep 2020
CYVC symptoms on young lemon leaves

Two new citrus virus diseases found in Turkey

“Two serious viral diseases are affecting Turkey’s citrus cultivation and threatening all the Mediterranean countries”. This was reported by Antonino Catara, former president of the International Organisation of Citrus Virologists.

“One of the two diseases – continued the scientist – is the Citrus Chlorotic Dwarf CCD, which mainly affects lemon and grapefruit plants, but also marginally mandarin and clementine plants. The viral infection has a significant impact on the yield and quality of the fruit, as well as on the crown’s vegetative development, due to the short internodes”.

Read More

23 Sep 2020
Citrus

Citrus industry negotiates a new trade deal

Cape Town – After eleven years of negotiations, South Africa’s citrus industry has been given the go-ahead to export to the Philippines, with the signing of a work plan between the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, and the Philippines Bureau of Plant and Industry.

Agriculture Minister Thoko Didiza made the announcement yesterday as the South African citrus industry estimates that close to 500 000 tons of additional citrus would be available for export by 2024.

Read More

23 Sep 2020
Coldling Moth

South Africa takes proactive FCM measures with its EU citrus exports

For the first time since 2018 when the South African citrus industry introduced its False Codling Moth Management System, the citrus industry has had to intervene in its normal functioning to manage false codling moth.

The decision to strengthen the shipping protocol for South Africa’s oranges for the rest of the season, on very short notice, is made possible by the agility of its systems approach, says Deon Joubert, Citrus Growers’ Association envoy to the EU. The system’s requirements for continuous, thorough orchard and fruit monitoring had made it clear to the industry that there was a lot of false codling moth activity this year.

Read More

23 Sep 2020
Citrus rootstock evaluation

Citrus rootstock evaluation utilizing UAV-based remote sensing and artificial intelligence

The implementation of breeding methods requires the creation of a large and genetically diverse training population. Large-scale experiments are needed for the rapid acquisition of phenotypic data to explore the correlation between genomic and phenotypic information. Traditional sensing technologies forfield surveys and field phenotyping rely on manual sampling and are time consuming and labor intensive. Since availability of personnel trained for phenotyping is a major problem, small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles) equipped with various sensors can simplify the surveying procedure, decrease data collection time, and reduce cost.

Read More