31 Oct 2019
Cover Crops

Citrus Grower Sees Success with Cover Crops

Ed James has citrus in his veins. He has been working and thriving in the citrus business since he was a teenager — from hoeing orange trees to owning a caretaking business that serviced thousands of acres. That is, until about eight years ago.

In 2010, James looked around his personal 45-acre citrus grove and realized it was time to throw in the towel. The citrus industry in Florida had gone from over 800,000 acres to less than 400,000 acres. Citrus greening was the main culprit, but there were other factors for the decline. For James, it had just become completely unprofitable. The trees looked stunted and almost dead from foot rot, Diaprepes root weevil and HLB.

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26 Sep 2019
Greater varieties

South Africa wants greater varietal spread of citrus & table grapes in Japanese trade

Carolize Jansen
www.freshplaza.com

A recent visit to Japan for the annual Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD), which was joined by the Citrus Growers’ Association at the behest of President Cyril Ramaphosa, provided the association with a salient opportunity to address some nagging aspects of fruit trade with that country, as well as to press the fruit industry’s interests.

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26 Sep 2019
Mandarins for harvest

Farmers, researchers try to hold off deadly citrus greening long enough to find cure

Diane Nelson, UC Davis
https://phys.org

In an orange grove outside Exeter, California, workers climb aluminum ladders to pick fruit with expert speed. California produces 80 percent of the nation’s fresh oranges, tangerines and lemons, most of it in small Central California communities like these.

“This may be the last place in the world where you can still grow citrus,” says farmer Richard Bennett, reaching high to pull an orange from a tree. He peels it in two long ribbons, and the scent of zest fills the air. “Citrus is so important to our health and economy, and it’s threatened by a devastating disease.”

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28 Aug 2019
Post bloom Fruit Drop

Plant hormone inhibitors for reducing postbloom fruit drop (pfd) of citrus

Hiu-Ling Liao, Huiqin Chen & Kuang-Ren Chung
University of Florida, IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center

Postbloom fruit drop (PFD) of citrus is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. The fungus infects flower petals causing brownish lesions that result in young fruit drop, leaf distortion, and formation of persistent calyces (commonly called ‘buttons’) after the fruitlet drops. Previous studies suggested that an imbalance of plant growth regulators such as auxin, ethylene, and jasmonic acid in C. acutatum-infected flowers, may contribute to young fruit drop.

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28 Aug 2019
Cover crops

Cover crops for citrus

Sarah Strauss, Davie Kadyampakeni, Ramdas Kanissery, Tara Wade, Lauren Diepenbrock and Juanita Popenoe
Citrus Industry

Cover crops are specific crops not intended for sale but for soil improvement and sustainability. They are increasingly common in the agricultural fields of the Midwest and other grain-producing regions because of the wide range of benefits not just for the soil, but also the cash crop. In those systems, cover crops improve water and nutrient retention, promote microbial activity, reduce weed growth and insect pests, and improve plant growth. Similar impacts have been found in tree crops like apples and peaches, where cover crops are planted in row middles.

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31 Jul 2019
Citrus Improvement

Quality and Quantity Improvement of Citrus: Role of Plant Growth Regulators

Harsimrat K. Bons, H.S. Rattanpal
Department of Fruit Science, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.
Nirmaljit Kaur
Department of Botany, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, India.

Citrus is one of the most important fruit tree species in the world, as the fruits are a valuable source of nutrients, vitamins and other antioxidant compounds. The citrus productivity depends on various factors, among these the plant growth regulators holds a prime position. The use of plant growth regulators has become an important component in the field of citriculture because of the wide range of potential roles they play in increasing the productivity of crop per unit area. The plant growth regulating compounds actively regulate the growth and development by regulation of the endogenous processes and there exogenous applications have been exploited for modifying the growth response.

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30 Apr 2019
Aluminum toxicity

Aluminum Toxicity and Tolerance in Plants

Emmanuel Delhaize and Peter R. Ryan
Division of Plant Industry, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Australia

The most easily recognized symptom of Al toxicity is the inhibition of root growth, and this has become a widely accepted measure of A1 stress in plants. In simple nutrient solutions micromolar concentrations of Al can begin to inhibit root growth within 60 min. However, the inhibition of growth per se offers little information about the causes of stress that will either precede or coincide with changes in growth. To understand the mechanisms of Al toxicity, it is essential to identify the primary sites involved, both anatomical and metabolic, being mindful that A1 could have diverse effects and act differently in different species.

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30 Apr 2019
Aluminum toxicity

How do Citrus Crops Cope with Aluminum Toxicity

KKIU Arunakumara
Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ruhuna, Mapalana, Kamburupitiya, Sri Lanka
Buddhi Charana Walpola1,  Min-Ho Yoon
Department of Bio-Environmental Chemistry, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764, Korea

World Agriculture faces daunting challenges in feeding the growing population today. Reduction in arable land extent due to numerous reasons threatens achievement of food and nutritional security. Under this back ground, agricultural use of acidic soils, which account for approximately 40 % of the world arable lands is of utmost important. However, due to aluminum (Al) toxicity and low available phosphorous (P) content, crop production in cidic soils is restricted. Citrus, in this context, gains worldwide recognition as a crop adapted to harsh environments. The present paper reviewed Al toxicity and possible toxicity alleviation tactics in citrus.

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30 Apr 2019
Aluminium in Acid Soils

Aluminium in Acid Soils

Dragana Krstic, Dragoslav Nikezic
University of Kragujevac, Faculty of Science
Ivica Djalovic
Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops
Dragana Bjelic
University of Kragujevac, Faculty of Agronomy
Serbia

Soil acidity is a limiting factor affecting the growth and yield of many crops all over the world. The basic problems concerning chemical properties of more acid soils are, besides acidity itself, the presence of toxic compounds and elements, such as soluble forms of Al, Fe and Mn, nitrites and various toxic organic acids. Aluminium (Al) toxicity is one of the major constraints on crop productivity on acid soils, which occur on up to 40% of the arable lands of the world.

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31 Mar 2019
Citrus Juice

Modulation in yield and juice quality characteristics of citrus fruit from trees supplied with zinc and potassium foliarly

M. Yasin Ashraf, F. Hussain, J. Akhter
Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology (NIAB), Jhang Road, Faisalabad, Pakistan
M. Ashraf
Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Department of Botany and Microbiology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
G. Ebert
Agricultural Advisory Department, K+S KALI GmbH, Kassel, Germany

Citrus is the largest fruit crop grown in Pakistan and Kinnow is the major planted species. About 94% of the total citrus is produced in the Punjab province (Sharif et al., 2005). Macro- and micro-nutrient deficiencies have been reported in citrus orchards of Punjab (Rashid et al., 1994). These deficiencies are usually recognized by distinctive symptoms that appear on the leaves and sometimes on fruits, branches or general growth of the tree (Ibrahim et al., 2007).

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